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Despite mild criticism, Zimmermann signing a relative bargain for Tigers

Jordan Zimmermann quietly posted 3.4 WAR in 2015, or 0.1 more than Chris Sale. Brad Mills/USA TODAY Sports

It took five years and $110 million for the Detroit Tigers to bring right-handed starter Jordan Zimmermann into the fold. That's hardly a small token, though these days, that still qualifies as a second-tier contract among starting pitchers. If you look at traditional rate stats -- strikeouts and walks, for example -- Zimmermann clearly belongs in that second tier; he's not the pitcher guys like Cole Hamels and Jon Lester have been over the past five years. He also doesn't have their stuff, at least not when judged by the strikeout. What Zimmermann does have is much harder to get a handle on. The basic term would probably be his unique command, but it's not an easy thing to put your finger on when it comes to stats.

A pitcher with great command might intentionally throw a ball outside the zone -- even at the risk of walking a hitter -- on purpose. So we can't just use walk rate to determine command. But pitchers with great command also have a tendency to get to two strikes quickly without being damaged as hitters sit back and look for better pitches to hit. Elite pitchers also can do this, but more because hitters can't hit their pitches, and the elite guys can also finish off hitters with that stuff. But in many cases, what makes a second-tier pitcher just that is they don't have that put-away stuff.

That definitely describes Zimmermann, whose 7.32 K/9 rate ranked 50th of 78 qualifying pitchers. But here's the thing about the Wisconsin native: When it comes to getting to two strikes, Zimmermann is among the elite. And though the swinging (or called) strike three is a lot more glorious, as it's the surest way to get the out, Zimmermann has proven just as effective as getting hitters out once he gets two strikes.

The relative lack of K's, the "second-tier" label ... these are reasons Zimmermann, still in the prime of his career at age 29, could be had for $22 million per year versus the bigger dollar figures we've seen in recent years. But here's the thing: He's a better value than many of those making more money, including the aforementioned Hamels and Lester, and here's why: